Carolina Fernandez Rodriguez

Email:
carol [at] uniovi.es
Title:
Professor of American Literatures and Cultures
Affiliation:
University of Oviedo
Appointment Dates:
(Jul 1, 2017 – Aug 31, 2017)
Research Project:
Public and Private Education Systems in the U.S.: the extent to which they integrate children from different ethnic groups
The aim of my stay at the UC Berkeley, as a scholar within the BBRG Affiliated Scholar Program, will be to analyze the US education system considering the extent to which it integrates (or fail to do so) children from different ethnic groups. After learning about demographic facts as to the ethnic distribution of children across the country’s school districts, their school drop rates and other indicators of school success or failure, and after acquiring knowledge about the specific programs or measures American schools have been implementing in the last decades in an attempt to promote multicultural understanding, I will devote my stay to finding and analyzing literary representations of the specific challenges faced by American children in schools. Special attention will be given to the case of Latina girls and, more specifically, to the effect that immigrant status, gender, sexual orientation, social class and command of English and/or Spanish have on their capacity to integrate into American society.
Biography
Carolina Fernández Rodríguez has a PhD in English Philology and she teaches American Literatures and Cultures at the University of Oviedo (Spain). Her research focuses on contemporary women’s writing, with a special focus on feminist revisions of fairy tales, a topic on which she has written three books and several articles. She is also interested in the representation of latinidades in American literature and mass media, and in issues related to multiculturalism as portrayed in children’s and young adults’ literature. More recently, she has started to work on the evolution of romantic novels, the deconstruction of romantic love, and the exoticization of colonial and postcolonial contexts in historical romantic novels. Her latest work, in this sense, is a study of two romantic novels written by Chamorro writers from Guam.